THERE, THERE

September 2021

COINED BY THE ENVIRONMENTALIST David Foreman in 1990, rewilding describes a preservation strategy that allows ecosystems to strike a new equilibrium after long periods of abuse and reckless overextraction. While certainly contentious in conservation circles, the promise of a clean slate at a moment when all other options seem exhausted has gained traction in the popular imagination (just think of how many “nature is healing” memes have floated around in the past year and a half). In their essay “Cur(at)ing for a Broken World: The Case for Collective Rewilding,” the curatorial group Collective Rewilding (Sara Garzón, Ameli M. Klein, and Sabina Oroshi) turns to the conservationist term for its “implication that humans have a responsibility to other human or non-human species to restore self-regulating and self-sustaining ecological communities.” It proposes a radical reorganization

— Kate Sutton

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